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Top 4 Best Corded Drills of 2018

Best corded drill reviews 2018

Best-in-class
DEWALT DW130V

DEWALT DW130V 9 Amp Drill with Spade Handle

The best professional drill

Commercial-grade corded drill withstands high-volume applications and is compatible with a wide range of drill bits.

DEWALT DW130V Review

Whether you’re a contractor looking for the right drill or a homeowner in search of a reliable tool, the DEWALT DW130V could be the best corded drill for you.

Powered by a 9-Amp motor, this 0.5-inch drill is perfect for applications that require heavy-duty downward pressure and is compatible with a wide range of drill bits including spade, self-feed, hole saw, auger, and twist bits.

Adjustable side and rear handles, variable speed and reversible switch add versatility, making the drill suitable for drilling or mixing drywall mud and paint.

Performance is also ensured by the high speed up to 550 RPM, that is ideal for most commercial demands.

Powerful, easy to handle, and suitable for multiple applications, the DEWALT DW130V delivers all you could ask from a best-in-class corded drill.

Best value
DEWALT DWD210G

DEWALT DWD210G 10-Amp Pistol-Grip Drill

Value for money

Powerful corded drill is compatible with a range of drill bits for wood and metal applications.

DEWALT DWD210G Review

The DEWALT DWD210G is one of the best corded drills for amateurs and contractors and delivers impressive power and capabilities at an attractive price point.

Powered by a 10-Amp motor that spins up to 1,250 RPM in forward and reverse modes, this tool drills through wood and metal in the glimpse of an eye and can handle alternative household applications.

Its soft grip handle and perfect balance make it comfortable to use, while the metal housing ensures durability.

Another great feature is the overload protection that delivers a safe operation and prolongs the unit’s lifespan.

Offering a drill bit capacity up to 1.5 inches with a spade or auger bit and up to 2.125 inches with a self-feed bit, powerful, and versatile, the DEWALT DWD210G brings the best value for money.

Also great
Hitachi D10VH

Hitachi D10VH 6.0-Amp Reversible Driver Drill

Good, but less powerfull

High-torque corded drill withstands commercial-grade applications but is equipped with a less powerful motor.

Hitachi D10VH Review

The Hitachi D10VH is a great alternative to our best-value, presenting itself as a reliable tool capable of drilling at variable speeds up to 2,500 RPM despite its smaller motor of only 6 Amperes.

This makes it ideal for a wide range of applications, from drilling soft metals, wood, and plastic, to stainless steel and similar materials.

A keyless chuck makes it easy to change the drill bits without any tools, while the drilling capacity goes up to one inch through wood and 0.375-inch through steel.

Lightweight and easy to handle, the Hitachi D10VH is perfect for the novice but also for the more experienced hobbyist looking for a highly reliable tool.

Powerful enough to withstand heavier duty demands, ergonomic, and easy to control with just one hand, this corded drill is perfect for an amateur’s or beginner’s arsenal.

Best budget
DEWALT DWD112

DEWALT DWD112 8.0-Amp VSR Pistol-Grip Drill

Cheap & powerful

Lightweight corded drill is compatible with multiple drill bits and comes at a more than attractive price.

DEWALT DWD112 Review

The DEWALT DWD112 is perhaps the best option for the hobbyist looking for an inexpensive yet reliable drill.

This corded machine is powered by an 8-Amp motor that spins up to 2,500 RPM. The unit can drill through most materials and is compatible with drill bits for wood and steel, providing sufficient flexibility for handling a variety of materials.

Lightweight and easy to maneuver, the tool also features a soft grip handle and comes with an all-metal ratcheting keyless chuck that allows for a fast change between the bits.

Its 100% ball-bearing construction and variable speed trigger prolong the unit’s lifespan and make it easy to use.

Ergonomic, suited for heavy-duty jobs and affordable, the DEWALT DWD112 is a great corded budget drill for home and job site use.

2. Corded vs. cordless drill

Electric drills come in their corded or cordless variants:

  • Corded drills: Are ideal for the homeowners or professionals who always have a wall outlet within easy reach. These machines offer heavy-duty power, are lightweight, and easy to maneuver with only one hand. They restrict your mobility, but on the bright side, they offer unlimited runtime and are perfect for high-volume jobs.
  • Cordless drills: Appeal to those who value mobility over runtime. They are typically powered by batteries between 12 and 18 volts; commercial cordless drills withstand high-volume demands, but they will still have to be recharged periodically. Cordless drills are also heavier due to the weight of the battery which adds up to the total heft of the tool.

When to choose a corded drill?

Investing in a corded drill could be your best option if:

  • You need high power, despite the restricted mobility;
  • You need to use the tool for extended periods of time without breaks;
  • Price is a key factor – corded drills tend to be more affordable than their cordless counterpart.

3. Corded drill power

Power is key to choosing the best corded drill. A more powerful motor means a higher torque, but you must look at more than just motor’s amperage.

A corded tool’s power is expressed in watts, but not all manufacturers state the watt output of their machines. Luckily, calculating the watt output is easy as long as you know the motor’s amperage and voltage, two numbers disclosed in the manual of the tool.

Most home use and commercial corded drills are equipped with motors between 6 and 10 Amperes (Amp), although some models may have weaker or stronger motors. The vast majority run on either 110V or 120V.

How to assess wattage?

You can calculate the unit’s watts output by multiplying amperes by volts. For example:

  • A corded drill with a 6-Amp motor running on 110V has an output of 660 watts.
  • A corded drill with a 6-Amp motor running on 120V has an output of 720 watts, almost as a 7-Amp unit running on 110V.

A higher wattage provides higher torque and is capable of spinning the drill at higher speeds.

4. Drilling speed (RPM)

Depending on the size of the holes you want to drill and type of material you’re drilling through, you might need a lower or higher speed. As a general rule, larger bits must turn slower, or they can overheat. Likewise, drilling through harder materials also requires lower speeds.

Corded drills have the speed expressed in revolutions per minute (RPM), and there are three types of drills to choose from:

  • Single speed drills: Are the least versatile and are only suitable for a few applications, such as drilling wood, for example. These tools typically spin at around 2,000 RPM.
  • Fixed speed drills: Typically have two or three speeds with a difference between the speeds of about 500 RPM. The operator can set the drill to spin slower or faster, but won’t have the possibility to set the desired speed.
  • Variable speed drills: Are the most versatile and the operator can adjust the speed to any RPM available.

What drilling speed do you need?

If you only want to drill through one type of material, a single or fixed speed machine could save you some money. On the contrary, a variable speed corded drill allows you to make holes in most materials.

Typically, you should drill at:

Material

Speed (RPM)

Wood

2,000 – 10,000

Aluminum

2,000 – 7,000

Brass, bronze

1,500 – 6,000

Cast iron

500 – 2,000

High carbon steel, alloys

300 – 1,500

5. Best chuck size and type

The chuck size, also referred to as shaft size, determines the diameter of the drill bit compatible with the corded drill. Depending on the type of drill bit used, the size of the chuck either coincides with the diameter of the bit – such as the case of high speed steel (HSS) drill bits – or smaller when the drill is used with hole cutters.

Typically, corded drills have either:

  • 3/8-inch (10mm) chucks: Ideal for light-duty applications and amateur use.
  • 1/2-inch (13mm) chucks: Ideal for heavy-duty applications.

The best corded drills have adjustable chucks that can accommodate drill bits of both diameters.

Best chuck type

Changing the drill bit requires to open the chuck. Depending on the type of chuck, you might need a special wrench for this operation:

  • Key chucks: Require you to use a chuck wrench to open and close the chuck’s jaws.
  • Keyless chucks: Are easier to open and close with just a twist of the wrist and you won’t have to worry about losing the wrench.

6. Screwdriver and hammer functions

Some corded drills can double as electric screwdrivers while others have a hammer function and can be used to drill holes in masonry materials.

  • Almost all corded drills have a reverse drive mode that transforms the tool into a screwdriver when used with the right bits. The normal drilling function drives the screws into the material, while the reverse mode unscrews them.
  • Some corded drills, also called hammer drills, perform two movements at the same time by spinning and moving the drill bit back and forth at high speed, allowing you to drill holes in masonry. The hammer function can be engaged or disengaged as needed.

7. Other important features

The best corded drills must also have a few other important features:

  • Ergonomics: The machine must be lightweight, well-balanced and easy to operate. Invest in a unit with soft grip and make sure the trigger is placed within easy reach.
  • Depth stop: This accessory stops the bit from going too deep into the material and can be removed when not required.
  • Brushless motor: This type of motor has a longer lifespan and delivers higher power than a brushed motor, increasing the tool’s efficiency.
  • Built-in level: Allows you to adjust drill holes accurately when the project requires multiple holes at the same level.
  • Built-in light: Illuminates the drilling point and is useful when working in poorly lit environments.
  • Side handle: Heavier duty corded drills come with a side handle that increases control and stability when drilling through harder materials.
  • Safety: An overload protection designed to stop the tool in case of current fluctuations reduces the risk of death through electrocution and prolongs the machine’s lifespan.
  • Accessories: Some corded drills come with convenient carrying cases, and some can even come with multi-purpose drill bits.
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